White Chocolate Ganache Recipe | Bakepedia

White Chocolate Ganache

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White Chocolate Ganache

This combination of white chocolate and cream can be used to form the centers of truffles or melted and used as a glaze over ice cream or cake. Don’t even think of making this with cheap white chocolate. I prefer El Rey Icoa, as it has a very flavorful, minimally processed cocoa-butter component, which means it really tastes like white chocolate, as opposed to just sweet. For a tangy flavor, substitute crème fraiche for the cream for an elegant variation. In the image above, I deliberately pooled the ganache for you to see an ideal liquid texture. When used in this state, it should be fluid but not ultra-runny. You want it to pour over your cake or baked good smoothly, but not be so hot that it runs off the sides! Cool it a bit so that it flows, but allows you some control.

White Chocolate Ganache
Author: 
Makes: Makes about 80 truffles or about 2 ½ cups glaze
 
Ingredients
  • 1⅓ cups heavy cream
  • 1 pound white chocolate, very finely chopped, such as El Rey Icoa or Valrhona Ivoire
Instructions
  1. Place heavy cream in a medium saucepan over medium heat and bring just to a low boil; remove from the heat. Stir white chocolate into cream, cover and allow to sit for 5 minutes. Stir gently until smooth.
  2. The ganache is ready to use in this liquid state as a glaze, or pour the ganache into an airtight container, cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until firm enough to roll, preferably overnight. Refrigerate up to 1 week or freeze up to 1 month. You may re-warm ganache to its fluid state on low power in microwave or over very low heat in a saucepan.
 

Bakepedia Tips

  • While we often use the microwave for melting chocolate, especially when it is combined with cream or butter, we prefer not to employ this technique with white chocolate because it is much more temperature-sensitive; you can keep an eye on it when melting it in the manner described above.
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