Peach Breakfast Cobbler with Cornmeal Thyme Biscuits

Peach Breakfast Cobbler with Cornmeal Thyme Biscuits

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Peach Breakfast Cobbler with Cornmeal Thyme Biscuits_1

This recipe is from Whole-Grain Mornings and I was immediately drawn to the sweet and savory aspect of this peach breakfast cobbler recipe as well as the thought of  peach cobbler for breakfast! It is as quick as described and would make a great Father’s Day breakfast. Love the tip of using the peaches skin-on. Extra fiber and you really don’t need that extra step of peeling them.

Reprinted with permission from Whole-Grain Mornings by Megan Gordon (Ten Speed Press, © 2013). Photo Credit: Clare Barboza

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The fragrance released by juicy peaches baking beneath herbed-cornmeal biscuits is a very fine thing to wake up to on a summer Sunday morning. Because this cobbler takes a little time to bake, I’ll mix the dry ingredients for the biscuits the night before. When I wake up, I’m just slicing peaches and adding the wet ingredients to the dough while the coffee is brewing. By the time I’ve finished my first cup of coffee, it’s ready to pull from the oven. For added decadence, serve with a dollop of Greek yogurt, crème fraîche, or honeyed ricotta. I use my ten-inch cast-iron skillet here, but if you don’t have one at home, feel free to make this in a two-quart baking dish instead.

Morning Notes: I don’t peel peaches for this recipe. They soften and cook down just fine, so you’ll hardly notice the skins. If you’re set on doing so, cut a small X with a paring knife on the bottom of each peach, then dunk the peaches in almost boiling water for 60 seconds or so; the skins will slide right off.

Peach Breakfast Cobbler with Cornmeal Thyme Biscuits
Author: 
Makes: 6
 
Ingredients
Filling
  • 2 pounds / 900 g ripe peaches,
  • pitted and halved (5 to 6 peaches)
  • 1 ⁄4 cup / 45 g natural cane sugar
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed
  • lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
  • 3 tablespoons unbleached
  • all-purpose flour
  • 1 ⁄4 teaspoon kosher salt
Cornmeal Thyme Biscuits
  • 3 ⁄4 cup / 90 g unbleached all-purpose
  • flour
  • 1 ⁄2 cup / 60 g whole wheat flour
  • 1 ⁄2 cup / 65 g fine-ground yellow
  • cornmeal
  • 3 tablespoons natural cane sugar
  • 11 ⁄2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3 ⁄4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
  • 5 tablespoons / 70 g cold unsalted
  • butter, cut into 1 ⁄4-inch cubes,
  • plus more for greasing the skillet
  • 1 ⁄2 cup / 120 ml plain yogurt, homemade or store-bought
  • 1 ⁄2 cup / 120 ml buttermilk
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Lightly butter a 10-inch cast-iron skillet. Cut each peach half into five slices. In a bowl, toss together the peaches, sugar, lemon juice, and lemon zest and let sit until the sugar has begun to dissolve into the fruit, about 10 minutes.
  2. To make the filling: Add the flour and salt to the peaches and stir to combine. Set aside while preparing the dough.
  3. To make the biscuits: In a bowl, sift together the flours, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Add the butter and incorporate it, using your fingertips, until the mixture is the consistency of coarse meal (it’s okay if it contains some pea-sized bits, too). Add the yogurt and buttermilk and stir until the dough just comes together.
  4. To assemble and bake the cobbler: Pour the peaches into the prepared pan. Drop small mounds of dough, about 3 tablespoons each, onto the fruit. This yields 7 to 8 biscuits, so someone at the breakfast table will get to sneak an extra on top of their peaches.
  5. Bake until the biscuits are golden brown on top and the peach juice is thickening and bubbling, 30 to 40 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool for at least 20 minutes before serving.
  6. Serve warm or at room temperature. This cobbler is really best enjoyed the day it’s made. The texture of the biscuits changes after a day or so on the counter.
 

 

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